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    Special Photo Annual Edition

publisher's note by Glenn Dubock

THE NEXT 10 YEARS OF WANDERLUST AND LIGHT // BY GLENN DUBOCK

Somewhere in my first decade on this planet I read an article called “Seven Solitary Secrets.” It was a simple tale, lavishly illustrated with enticing yet unidentified surfing locations that encouraged the reader to seek out the waves not ridden just off the roads less traveled. Did the trick; it set me on a wanderlust for fun and photography that has not let up for several decades.

I now want to challenge our happy, growing family of paddlers to take this 10-year-old “child” we know as standup paddling and show it the world—to not follow the herd instinct, but rather to look around every roaring bend in the river, search every mystic headland of the coast, explore behind that tall stand of trees on the far side of the lake.

Who among you will join me as we seek to find our own solitary secrets?

Send us some photos of where you’ve been—no need to say exactly where it is if you don’t want to. Feel free to act like a kid again; a 10-yearold out discovering a whole new world. This photo annual is a celebration of that spirit of wanderlust, a tribute to our photographer friends who seek out the light in all those far corners of our liquid dreams. –Glenn

SYLVAIN DEMERCASTEL SECRET SPOT

Sylvain Demercastel: Secret Spot

Sometimes you find a wrapping reef that you want to save for yourself. A place you will never hand out maps to, but will gladly take special friends who appreciate sharing a day like this.

Blisskrieg: Inspire Your Next Sudden Escape

“It was the season’s first northwest swell. It began wrapping into the central coast of California the day after daylight savings came to an end, making the day feel unnaturally short. Not wanting to give up and succumb to the early nights of winter, paddler Fletcher Burton and I used up every last drop of light available to us, pushing the favorable tide to the limits. We decided to call it a night only after the stars began appearing and darkness prevailed.” –Jason

Tom Servias Clowdbreak

Tom Servais: Cloudbreak

“Laird had been trying to get back to Cloudbreak for quite a few years to sup it big, but when you’re as busy as Laird it’s not always that easy to drop commitments when a swell shows. As it turned out, the World Surfing League women’s competition was going on, but the giant swell actually forced them to move to inside to Tavarua where waves were smaller. So, Laird was free to GO BIG, and there were some bombs! It wasn’t as big as Laird had hoped, but there was plenty of juice, and it was big enough to break one of his oversized sup guns in half. On this session, he was the last guy out. Everybody else had paddled back to the boat—the tired and hungry surfers just wanted to head back to Tavarua Island Resort and have lunch. Needless to say, it was worth waiting to witness Laird surfing alone. Besides, who was going to order him back in the boat?!” –Tom

Pierre Bouras: Lost In Chile’s Atacama Highlands

“We got so lost on this day. We actually had to back up our truck on a narrow dirt road for a few miles because we couldn’t even make a U-turn! There is no cell phone or GPS here, so it took us two days to locate this salt lake by following very poor directions from a friend. After many dead ends and a two-hour drive into the middle of the volcanoes, we finally arrived at the Laguna Leija. The weather here is always uncertain, and it had snowed the night before.

As I found my way through the icy water, I could not believe the scenery around me—joyous beauty that almost brought me to tears—but I had to pull it together for fear that my tears would freeze!

Crossing this body of water at an elevation of 14,193 feet felt sketchy. I was praying that the wind would stay light!” –Carine